Man and woman

Understanding Men, Women, and Money

For most people, money is never just money; it is a tool to accomplish some of life’s goals. It is love, power, happiness, security, control, dependency, independence, freedom and more. When two individuals form an enduring relationship with each other, money is always a partner, too.

Men and women vary in their idea of personal boundaries because they are both raised largely by women. Men have to psychologically disconnect more from women because of the sex difference; women do not have to separate so rigidly, and therefore can afford less distinct boundaries.

Second, men are raised to see the world as hierarchical and competitive. Women see the world as cooperative and democratic; they share. In addition, it is accepted that women are needy and vulnerable, while men are discouraged from such display.

When men make more money than their spouse, they believe their superior earnings entitle them to greater power in decision-making. By contrast, women who make more than their mates almost always desire democratic decision-making.

Money issues are different from other problems in a relationship. These problems are significantly more difficult to talk about and harder to resolve because of our extensive cultural conditioning. The most important thing in communication is empathy. It’s more important to be heard and understood than to have a partner agree with what you say without listening.

Mellan, Men, Women, and Money

What do you think? Can you relate? Or, is your situation different? Please let us know what you think by posting your comments on our Financially Savvy Women Fanpage.

Boomer Couple in Front of Their Beach House

Women and Financial Power

Too many women lack the confidence necessary to take control of their financial lives. Women fear making investments, managing their finances, planning and monitoring their spending, managing investments, and increasing their wealth.

Why aren’t women more confident with their finances?

The answer is that women are stopping themselves from being assertive. Many women leave their financial lives to their husbands, boyfriends or parents, and because of this way of thinking, they lack financial power. Financial empowerment must come from within. Women must seize it with fervor, reflecting an unshakable determination to take control of their financial lives. You must tell yourself that you can become empowered, and that you will not let outdated notions of gender hinder your success. Keep “EMPOWER” in your mind as an acronym representing these concepts:

Education is critical
Motivation inspired by your values
Protection against risk
Ownership of your future
Work — claiming what is yours requires effort
Emotions should be kept out of decisions
Responsibility to yourself

Do you use any acronyms to motivate you with your finances? I’d love to learn about yours! Please let us know what you think by posting your comments on our Financially Savvy Women Fanpage.

Gibbons, EmpowHer! Why more women are taking the financial lead

Financially Savvy Women have the wealth they deserve

5 Myths about Women and Wealth

There are several myths about women and wealth that you might not be aware of. Below are the top five myths about women and money:

  1. Women are not good at math: Nature, not nurture, accounts for the gap in math skills. However, there is a growing movement to expose more women to learning and mentoring opportunities in the fields of math, engineering, finance, and science.
  2. Women are impulsive spenders: Money is an equal-opportunity, all purpose mood changer. Just as many men impulsively spend and overshop as women. One major difference is how society labels it. Women overshop; men collect, a term that gives the activity an intellectual cast. However the underlying impulse behavior is the same.
  3. Women are too emotional to invest wisely: Female investors outperform men in the long run. Men try to compete with the market and chase returns, leading to more frequent trading and high transaction costs. Women take a long time to make an initial investment decision; they are committed to the decision in the long run. Women are less reactive to short term changes in the market, trade less frequently than men, and realize better long-term investment performance as a result.
  4. Women would rather let men manage the family finances: Women are the chief financial officers of their households in 66 out of 100 homes (2010 Women and Affluence Study by Women & Co.). Women in the ultra high net worth market reported they play a high to moderate role in the management of the family’s assets. When it comes to retirement, 90 percent of women participate in decisions that affect their household’s retirement and investment accounts.
  5. Women are not interested in wealth management: The gender gap in finance is diminishing as women enter the field. Advising clients lends itself to a woman’s strengths in relationship building and communication, allowing female advisors to have the opportunity to outperform men. Organizations like Directions for Women and The Female Affect offer forums and networking opportunities to facilitate the advancement of women in financial services.

Kingsbury, How to Give Financial Advice to Women

Understanding these myths will help you overcome and fears that you may have had when it comes to managing your finances. Do you know of any other myths about women and their wealth? Please let us know what you think by posting your comments on our Financially Savvy Women Fanpage.

 

Woman reading stock quotes from WSJ.

Ways Women can become Engaged in their Financial Life

Some women handle their money brilliantly all the time- in a perfect world. It is crucial to be connected with your finances. However, most of us are in dark about our finances for reasons like misunderstanding terms or not being involved enough. Luckily, there is always time for you to become engaged. The tips below will help you become involved with your personal finances:

  • Do you let your husband or partner manage money without your involvement? Change happens all the time in relationships, don’t start learning about your finances while you are in shock.
  • Do not sign your joint income tax return without reading it. Make sure you understand and thoroughly read your income tax return. If you need to, consult a professional; but don’t rush into signing anything.
  • Do you use your husband’s financial advisor, even if you don’t really like him, know him, or can’t stand him? At your next meeting with your Advisor, ask yourself how much YOU were engaged in the conversation. If not, consult with your partner and try to find an Advisor both of you can be engaged with.
  • Ask for confusing terms to be explained. Don’t let uncertainty and being uncomfortable get in the way of understanding your finances.
  • Not taking enough risk. We women tend to be more against taking risks. Women live longer lives; we retire with two-thirds the retirement savings of men. This calls for greater risk taking to earn a higher return. Many women HAVE to push themselves to do this.
  • Not seeing your money as a means to express your values. Value is defined as a person’s principles or standards of behavior. Many women express their values through the products they buy, the way they spend their time, and the companies they work for. However, few women view their investments as a tool for expressing value. Today, the new industry can represent a way for women to have their money work at more than just earning a financial return.

It is time for you to become engaged and find success in your finances! Take control now! Did you find this email helpful? I’d love to hear from you, please post feedback to Financially Savvy Women Fanpage.

 

Women, Money and Emotions

Women can be notorious for making financial decisions based on emotions. It can be as simple as splurging on a new dress or purse that may not be a fiscally sound decision but “you just had to have it!” Or more serious events like leaving substantial money on the table when experiencing a divorce or financial separation. These decisions are often motivated by guilt or to avoid further conflict, and often create a serious and long-term impact on a woman’s financial future.

While not all emotional decisions have a negative impact recognizing your tendency to make financial decisions based on emotions, it can help you navigate more serious issues with greater care.
What was the last emotional decision you made with money? What impact did it have on your financial situation?

Is Your Relationship with Money on the Rocks?

A relationship is defined as the way in which two or more concepts, objects, or people are connected. A relationship does not necessarily need to be between two people; it can also be between a woman and her money. Your money needs attention, respect, and understanding; all components are needed in a compatible relationship.

If you are struggling with or misunderstanding your finances, there are a couple steps you can take to acquire the relationship you WANT. First talk to a professional; make an appointment with a financial advisor. Next, educate yourself about money. Read something about finances everyday, that way you UNDERSTAND the other half of your relationship. You can also ask your money savvy colleagues for advice. Finally, be careful of rumors and scare tactics; those facts are generally skewed. Once you have defined and developed a healthy relationship with your money, you are on the road to success!

Source: Stanny, Time to Have a Love Affair with Your Money

Estate Planning: A Woman’s Issue?

While estate planning is important to BOTH men and women, it often has a greater impact on women. Women (on average) live longer and tend to marry older spouses, which makes them three times more likely than men to be widowed at 65. So for women, estate planning is a crucial part of retirement planning. Since they usually survive their spouses, women more often have the last word about how much wealth goes to family, charity, and the taxman.

Source: forbes.com

Tips to Talking About Money

Talking about money with your partner is tough. Eventually, we all have to do it. Don’t try to negotiate about money before airing your feelings; otherwise, negotiations will always break down. Here are some tips to get started with talking to your partner about money:

  1. Find an appropriate and stress free time when money is not a loaded issue (don’t use tax season for example).
  2. Articulate your concerns and fears about your partner’s money style. After you express your concerns, acknowledge what you admire about their methods.
  3. Talk to your partner about your goals for the future, short and long-term.
  4. Share your hopes and dreams.
  5. Contemplate making a shared budget or a spending plan together by merging your hopes and the goals.
  6. Set up a time to have the next talk. Aim for weekly conversations in the beginning, then monthly ones.

Source: Mellon, Men, Women, and Money

You Too Can Be a Courageous Woman

Being wealthy and financially engaged takes courage. For many women, their fear of facing their financial affairs only comes to light after experiencing a personal life crisis, divorce, and loss of a spouse or involuntary retirement. At that point your actions are more about survival. It takes courage to weed through the emotional aspects of challenging life events but your lack of financial knowledge only exacerbates an already stressful situation.
True courage is when a woman proactively decides to take charge of her financial affairs especially when life is Good. Courage is when a woman voluntarily becomes more engaged in the process of managing her money asking questions even if it makes her feel stupid. Courage is when a woman becomes aware of what she spends and what she needs before a crisis occurs to prompt her into action.

Proactively Manage your Money

What role do you want your money to play in your life? As a natural multi-tasker, you must incorporate a process or routine that allows you to proactively manage your money so that no stone is left unturned and nothing falls through the cracks. Just as we create routines and a process in other areas of life, we must do the same with our money.

checkbook

But the reality is there are many aspects to consider when managing your wealth. You’ve got your investments (stocks, bonds, mutual funds), insurance (life insurance, long term care, mortgages), lending issues, and estate planning. At times, it managing your wealth can feel overwhelming. That is why it is important to break everything down into a manageable system that works for you.